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ESI Special Topic of:
Air Pollution, Published August 2005

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Air Pollution

An INTERVIEW with Prof. Dr. Bert Brunekreef

ESI Special Topics, September 2005
Citing URL - http://www.esi-topics.com/airpoll/interviews/BertBrunekreef.html

In the interview below, Prof. Dr. Bert Brunekreef discusses his highly cited work in air pollution research. According to our analysis on this topic, Prof. Dr. Brunekreef ranks at #6, with 55 papers cited a total of 967 times. He also co-authored the papers at #8 and #11 on our list of the most-cited papers published on air pollution in the past two years. In the ISI Essential Science Indicators Web product, Prof. Dr. Brunekreef has many other papers related to air pollution that were not included in our analysis. His record includes 73 papers cited a total of 1,495 times to date in the field of Clinical Medicine and 12 papers cited a total of 364 times to date in the field of Environment/Ecology. Prof. Dr. Brunekreef is the Director of the Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences at the University of Utrecht, the Netherlands.

ST:  Why, in your view, is your work highly cited?

When I started in the early 1980s outdoor air pollution was not even considered much of a public health problem any more in Europe, something that has changed...

I guess papers get cited especially when something is shown for the first time, or at least early on in a certain field. This applies, I think, to our work on traffic-related pollution, on personal exposure, and on anti-oxidant suppletion.

ST:  What are the circumstances which led you to your work?

Health effects of air pollution have been of much regulatory and scientific interest in Europe in the last 20 years. This was catalyzed by the realization that ozone pollution had significant effects in Europe as in the US, by the realization that winter air pollution episodes had more harmful effects even at low levels of exposure than previously thought, and by the generally increased interest in the health effects of fine particles

ST:  How would you describe the significance of this work for your field?

That one is better answered by somebody else, but I do think our work on traffic and on personal exposure has had a fair amount of impact on other scientists and on regulation as well.

ST:  How much has this research advanced since you first started publishing on it?

Tremendously. When I started in the early 1980s outdoor air pollution was not even considered much of a public health problem any more in Europe, something that has changed due to circumstances briefly outlined before. Methodological advances in the analysis of time series studies have been enormous. The same is true with respect to exposure assessment methods.

ST:  Where do you see this research going 10 years from now?

There are still major unanswered questions especially related to the characteristics of fine particles in the air which are responsible for the health effects seen in epidemiological and toxicological studies. This will take much effort to resolve. Also, I think we will focus more on the direct contribution of sources (such as diesel engines) to adverse health effects. Finally, we will be asked more and more to demonstrate in our epidemiology if, and if so, to what extent, costly measures to reduce pollution have resulted in public health benefits.End

Prof. Dr. Bert Brunekreef
Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences
Utrecht University
Utrecht, the Netherlands

Prof. Dr. Bert Brunekreef's most-cited paper with 128 cites to date:
Brunekreef, B., Dockery D.W., and Krzyzanowski, M., "Epidemiologic studies on short-term effects of low levels of major ambient air pollution components," (Environ. Health Perspect. 103: 3-13, Suppl. 2, March 1995).

Source: ISI Essential Science Indicators

ESI Special Topics, September 2005
Citing URL - http://www.esi-topics.com/airpoll/interviews/BertBrunekreef.html

ESI Special Topic of:
Air Pollution, Published August 2005

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